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The Crooked Spoke Adjacent

You talk of times of peace for all, and then prepare for war

thinksquad:

Ever feel like you live in a bubble?

You do. We all do.

Our whole solar system appears to, say space scientists, who published work last month corroborating its existence.

And, oh, what a bubble it is: About 300 light years long (about 1,764,000,000,000,000 miles), and its walls are made of hot gas. How hot? About a million degrees.

Life beyond the planet NASA: Voyager has left the solar system
It’s called the “Local Bubble” or “local hot bubble” and is shaped a little like a peanut.

Scientists believe it was formed by supernovas, the largest explosions in space, as NASA calls them, that occur when a large star blows up.

One supernova blasts out more energy in less than a second than our sun gives off in a million years, NASA says. A single explosion can outshine an entire galaxy.

They usually occur about twice a century. But about 10 million years ago, a slew of them exploded right near our solar system.
“Supernovas went off like popcorn,” NASA says.

In a universe about 13.8 billion years old, that’s a recent event. Humans did not yet walk the Earth 10 million years ago, but monkeys did.
Those supernovas may have sent our evolutionary ancestors running scared, but they weren’t enough to annihilate them.

Fast forward 10 million years to the 1970s and 80s, when humans first began noticing what they’d later postulate was the bubble.
They were aiming more advanced telescopes at what’s called the interstellar medium.

Between the planets and the stars of our galaxy is not just empty space. There are gasses, dust, ions — and more — sweeping around.
When astronomers poked around in our solar system for it, they found little to nothing. It was like we were living in a virtually empty hole, one that has only a single atom per every liter of space.
Around the same time, sensors launched outside of Earth’s atmosphere revealed an abundance of something else coming from all directions — x-ray radiation.

The idea that we live in a bubble was born:
So much interstellar medium was gone, because the exploding supernovas have blown it away, and and left us surrounded with their remnants of radiating gas.

But some scientists, in recent years, cast doubt on the Local Bubble model, saying the radiation could be the result of “charge exchange” — passing solar winds stealing electrons and thereby emitting x-ray radiation.

Scientists from the University of Miami in Coral Gables picked up the gauntlet and developed a sensor to measure charge exchange radiation and fired it out of Earth’s atmosphere atop a small NASA rocket two years ago.

It only took about five minutes for the detector to take a reading. Analyzing the data, the scientists determined that only 40% of the background x-ray emanates from within our solar system.
The rest of the glow, they say, must come from the searing gaseous walls of a big bubble we live in.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/27/tech/innovation/space-local-bubble/index.html?c=&page=0

thinksquad:

Ever feel like you live in a bubble?

You do. We all do.

Our whole solar system appears to, say space scientists, who published work last month corroborating its existence.

And, oh, what a bubble it is: About 300 light years long (about 1,764,000,000,000,000 miles), and its walls are made of hot gas. How hot? About a million degrees.

Life beyond the planet NASA: Voyager has left the solar system
It’s called the “Local Bubble” or “local hot bubble” and is shaped a little like a peanut.

Scientists believe it was formed by supernovas, the largest explosions in space, as NASA calls them, that occur when a large star blows up.

One supernova blasts out more energy in less than a second than our sun gives off in a million years, NASA says. A single explosion can outshine an entire galaxy.

They usually occur about twice a century. But about 10 million years ago, a slew of them exploded right near our solar system.
“Supernovas went off like popcorn,” NASA says.

In a universe about 13.8 billion years old, that’s a recent event. Humans did not yet walk the Earth 10 million years ago, but monkeys did.
Those supernovas may have sent our evolutionary ancestors running scared, but they weren’t enough to annihilate them.

Fast forward 10 million years to the 1970s and 80s, when humans first began noticing what they’d later postulate was the bubble.
They were aiming more advanced telescopes at what’s called the interstellar medium.

Between the planets and the stars of our galaxy is not just empty space. There are gasses, dust, ions — and more — sweeping around.
When astronomers poked around in our solar system for it, they found little to nothing. It was like we were living in a virtually empty hole, one that has only a single atom per every liter of space.
Around the same time, sensors launched outside of Earth’s atmosphere revealed an abundance of something else coming from all directions — x-ray radiation.

The idea that we live in a bubble was born:
So much interstellar medium was gone, because the exploding supernovas have blown it away, and and left us surrounded with their remnants of radiating gas.

But some scientists, in recent years, cast doubt on the Local Bubble model, saying the radiation could be the result of “charge exchange” — passing solar winds stealing electrons and thereby emitting x-ray radiation.

Scientists from the University of Miami in Coral Gables picked up the gauntlet and developed a sensor to measure charge exchange radiation and fired it out of Earth’s atmosphere atop a small NASA rocket two years ago.

It only took about five minutes for the detector to take a reading. Analyzing the data, the scientists determined that only 40% of the background x-ray emanates from within our solar system.
The rest of the glow, they say, must come from the searing gaseous walls of a big bubble we live in.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/27/tech/innovation/space-local-bubble/index.html?c=&page=0

"The world’s top climate scientists agree that we’re losing the fight against climate change, report the New York Times and Bloomberg News, who got their hands on a leaked draft of a forthcoming report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The impacts of man-made climate change are already being felt around the world, it reportedly says, and ‘without additional mitigation, and even with adaptation, warming by the end of the 21st century will lead to high to very high risk of severe, widespread and irreversible impacts globally.’"
- It looks like we’re screwed =/ (via salon)

You don’t “fight” human nature


You re evaluate, adapt and then continue having faith that is motivated by the validation that we had the conscious awareness to even make a change In the first place

nerdsandgamersftw:

That’s it. That’s the flavor I’ve been looking for.

(via taelorbabyyyy)

(Source: donniedarkos, via short-cats)

Canada Is Experimenting With Prescription Heroin — But Only for a Select Few

To assume pharmaceuticals were ever anything different than heroin is actually a huge slap in the face to any remotely educated person.


But word, “heroin” is in the headline so sure why not, ill pretend I’m a dumb person to validate it.


Naaaaaaah I’m good with my self respect

(Source: micdotcom, via ricflairsniece)

weareoutofmind:

I just need someone to play with my hair.

For real tho

"Start ignoring people who threaten your joy.
Literally, ignore them.
Say nothing.
Don’t invite any parts of them into your space."
- Alex Elle (via textposter)

(Source: alexandraelle, via quiettrains)

vinebox:

When you home alone

(Source: vinebox, via m0onbunny)